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TOPIC: NextEngine 3d scanner

NextEngine 3d scanner 24 Sep 2015 08:33 #1

  • Gary Beckwith
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Since doing a little diversifying and starting the down size, I no longer use my 3d scanner
Its a NextEngine 3d HD scanner which includes the auto drive and HD Pro Software
price is $3k Includes free shipping to lower 48, will accept paypal/cc
contact me if interested.
thanks
Gary
www.beckwithdecor.com
ArtCam & Mach 3 Trainer
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NextEngine 3d scanner 09 Oct 2015 17:17 #2

  • Joe Jones
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Where are you located? I may be interested in purchasing that from you. Could you toss in a lesson to get me started? We could scan anything ... just so I can see how it works.

Wichita! 670 miles. A nice day's ride on the Goldwing! Let's TALK.

Joe
joejonesinkentucky (at) yahoo (dot) com

NextEngine 3d scanner 10 Oct 2015 22:48 #3

  • Gary Beckwith
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The scanner has sold thank you
I can see it going to a great new home with Joe
cheers
Gary
www.beckwithdecor.com
ArtCam & Mach 3 Trainer
Custom Tooling/Onsrud Distributor
Skype:beckwithdecor

NextEngine 3d scanner 11 Oct 2015 10:05 #4

  • Joe Jones
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Oh, man! I couldn't sleep last night, thinking about all of the things I will do (or at least attempt) with this new "toy!"

I can see some new Halloween decoration production in my future. Gargoyles and dragons and such, all different from the usual things sold at the Spirit Halloween Stores, all made from molds created and scaled. 1/4 scale (or FULL scale) dinosaur skeleton kits. Replacement of missing, cracked or warped old German coo-coo clock trim pieces. Duplication of an irreplaceable ornate table lamp that was once part of a set, before one was broken. The mind reels at the possibilities!

Foam statuary for yards and fountains (?) ... mold making for hard-to-find items, personalized BUSTS. Hey, Beethoven and Mozart have their own busts. Why can't WE?! Imagine foam wig stands for women that bear their own faces. Garden gnomes ... three feet tall! This is going to be FUN!

NextEngine 3d scanner 07 Nov 2015 23:53 #5

  • Dan Hammerstron
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UPDATE please: You got us, now we need you to keep us up to date, at least once a month...and I have a old german coo-coo with a broken part.!!!
The Wood Butcher

NextEngine 3d scanner 08 Nov 2015 09:01 #6

  • Joe Jones
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I have the scanner on one of my computer desks. My friends say my house looks like a Best Buy, with fully six computer work stations set up in various rooms. What the heck! I have no wife, no kids, no pets, and no plants to water. I like to keep it simple!

I purchased the $1,000.00 auto-rotation table from NextEngine, and it arrived even before the scanner got here, but now it is all here. I purchased a dedicated laptop for the scanner, an ASUS G751 gaming computer with a touch screen and a lot of power.

My initial attempts to scan items revealed that it is not a "plug-n-play" system. There is a definite learning curve to getting successful scans, but I was able to scan a few small items and produce a full 3D image. I bought some detailed plastic zoo animals from Tractor Supply. They are intended to be children's toys, but they are the right size, and detailed enough to give me a challenging scan. I have not yet played with the ultra-high-res scanning options, which would take a LONG time to perform. I am trying to learn the software, and get to a point where I can get it right the FIRST time. (Not there yet ...)

Now everything is set aside while I leave (in a few hours) to attend the FabTech trade show in Chicago over the next few days. I am going there to look at several machines, and among them, the KERN HSC100 laser table and the Baleigh hydraulic pipe bender. I will also look at iron workers, and other machines. I am not sure what I want to add to my shop next. I suppose it SHOULD be an INCOME! :unsure: I have to start producing a cash flow with these machines, or the whole shop will just end up being a big, super-expensive toy box. :-(

I made an unplanned trip to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida the other day. A woman was selling a brand new PlasmaCam CNC table for a good price, so I drove down to get it. I now have three CNC tables. Two Samson 510 CNC plasma tables, with one of them being converted to a router table, and now this smaller 4x4 PlasmaCam table which will also be a router table set up on a small trailer to be taken to craft shows and flea markets for on-the-fly production of simple signs and things.




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NextEngine 3d scanner 08 Nov 2015 09:13 #7

  • Joe Jones
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Along with the 3D scanner, I am working with a company to create a synchronized lift system for the gantry rails on my tables. Since my tables are PlasmaCam "plasma cutting tables" the company that designed them gave no thought to increasing the Z-axis capacity, assuming that it would always be cutting sheet metal or steel plate 1/4" or 1/2" thick. The machine offers only two inches of Z-axis travel at the moment. I want to carve rigid foam sheets up to 6" thick, so I have to make this modification.

The lift systems are coming in at $2,000 each ( I need three of them :blink: ) so that I can achieve three-dimensional carving with my table up to six inches in depth. Eventually, I will increase that to 10 or even 12 inches, but for now, 6 inches is sufficient.

I ordered two systems. One has 18" of lift, and the other has 36" of lift. :o Maybe I am crazy ... but I want the ability to place a wooden table or a desk, or something large onto the work surface and route into the top without needing to disassemble the object. With the 36" lift, I should be able to do inlays of woods or Mother of Pearl into old solid wood dining room tables and things like that. :ermm: Imagine routing the top of a wooden coffee table with a depression for the TV remote control, a pen, a cup holder, ... maybe inlay a chess board made of glass tiles ... a clock ... neon or EL wire lighting ..... Yeah. I am probably crazy. :y32b4:

Oh, this system is so cool! It has four linear actuators, and a digital screen. All four lifts are synchronized, and I can raise or lower the rail system by simply turning a dial to increase or decrease the height setting (digital readout) and then press a button to allow the machine to move to that new position. I will set up the slides using 80/20 aluminum extrusions. I cannot WAIT to get this installed on my tables!

NextEngine 3d scanner 21 Nov 2015 21:26 #8

  • Joe Jones
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Well, I do like the NextEngine scanner, but I have already upgraded to a much more capable unit (and more expensive too.) I may keep this NextEngine unit and play with it a bit more, or I may put it up on eBay. I added the auto-rotation table to it, so the package is more complete now. It does scan handguns well!

The scanner DOES work, quite well actually. I just have a need for speed, and so I decided to dive into a more professional unit ... financed over five years :o
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