Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: First commercial job - mounted individual letters

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 08 Jul 2012 17:32 #1

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Having followed a lot of your work/blogs over the last year I finally decided to put my car in first gear and take on a job. I currently work full time for a laser cutting company (but I used my own CNC router for the job) and the client was right across the road which made it very convenient. The client really appreciated the attention to their business.

Stage 1 was simple vinyl one-way-vision for the windows.

Stage 2 was the right hand Japanese logo.

Stage 3 is a giant 3D mechanical gearbox part made into another logo, on the left.

Why the stages? Full time job plus wife and 3 kids. Not much time left... But this might open the doors for an exit from my factory job...

As shown, I laser cut a stencil to support and register the letters on the wall. Silicone in a gun was used and because it's cold here I'm leaving the brace on for a few days.

Can I please ask: What method would you have used to mount this sign? The material is 3/4" exterior-use medium density fibreboard for the flat letters, and styro-spray polystyrene for the Japanese letters. All with 2-pak automotive finish.

Please don't hold back criticism. I've been in the school of hard knocks for a while and it's the best way to learn.
Attachments:
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 08 Jul 2012 18:11 #2

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
xxx
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 08 Jul 2012 19:03 #3

  • Rodger MacMunn
  • Rodger MacMunn's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 327
  • Points: 0
Well, I'm not sure what good moonshine ( xxx ) has to do with this, but I'm pretty impressed for a first job.
MY first definitely wasn't eye candy ....... eye puke would be a more accurate description.
I'd say that's pretty decent work
T.R.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 08 Jul 2012 19:56 #4

  • Jason Jones
  • Jason  Jones's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Admin
  • Floors & Latrine
  • Posts: 1824
  • Thank you received: 31
  • Points: 770
i'm with Rodger here. Nice looking sign.

So is that just another name for medex or extira or something?

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 08 Jul 2012 20:43 #5

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Thanks guys.

It probably is. Here is Oz and NZ it's called MDF (medium density fibreboard) but it's never used externally. However, in Melbourne I found a company called Ventech which do an exteria version that will not swell if wet.

With the 2-pak primer and top coats I'm pretty certain it won't be an issue, and the cost of material is low.

Here are Ventech's product specs: http://www.ventech.com.au/pages/products.asp?PID=18

I'm really hankering to get into this full time, but have a family to support. Not easy. It's going to be a gradual slide into it. The client here soooo appreciated the attention I have her, having previously received an unimaginative, over-priced quote from the local sign "guru". No one cares. Too many signs are merely a version of the clients' business card expanded and slapped onto their wall...
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 08 Jul 2012 20:56 #6

  • Dan Sawatzky
  • Dan Sawatzky's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 320
  • Thank you received: 44
  • Points: 4365
  • Honor Medal 2015
Look's great to me!
Dan Sawatzky
Sawatzky's Imagination Corporation
Yarrow, British Columbia, Canada

www.imaginationcorporation.com


Being a grampa is the most wonderful thing!

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 09 Jul 2012 11:18 #7

  • Joe Smith
  • Joe Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Junior Carver
  • Posts: 28
  • Points: 0
Love the ladder on the truck rack for extra height :P

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 11 Jul 2012 11:01 #8

  • Andrew Wilkerson
  • Andrew Wilkerson's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Carver
  • Posts: 63
  • Points: 60
Very nice, good to see an Aussie on here making a decent sign. I was starting to think we wern't capable
Timber
tim·ber/ˈtimbər/
Noun:
Lumber (American English;[1] used only in North America), or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world[2]) is wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 13 Jul 2012 05:52 #9

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Thanks for your positive comments. And thanks for the positive outlook on sign adhesion Andrew.
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 16 Jul 2012 21:51 #10

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Andrew - when r u next in Melbourne? We should catch a coffee somewhere in the hills...
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 17 Jul 2012 07:00 #11

  • Ian Stewart-Koster
  • Ian Stewart-Koster's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 93
  • Points: 0
Good work!

The thought of MDF outdoors makes me shudder, but if they reckon it's an exterior version, well...maybe...
I'll check out their website-thanks.

I'd imagine it'd be horribly heavy though-MDF is heavy stuff.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 17 Jul 2012 07:17 #12

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Thanks Ian. I had already looked at Multipanel but wanted to try polystyrene and styrospray first up to keep the cost down. The sytrospray wasn't coming up that nice on the letters. The Japanese letters I was happy with but needed something to quickly do the other letters in.

I tested the exteria MDF prior to moving forward with it and it held up very well when immersed in water for a few days. No expansion whatever. You could pry your fingernails into it if really trying. But certainly no expansion on it's own. It didn't flake, fall apart, break up or anything. It held in tact. So I figured a good 2-pak primer and 2-pak top coat would keep it all nice and tight for a good while under normal Melbourne weather.

However, funily enough I called Multipanel back today to reprice their product, as the next door neighbour from this job is already asking about getting signage for his brand new factory. I was hoping for 50mm thickness but will have to look at laminating the multipanel. And working out how to price it accordingly.
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 17 Jul 2012 07:55 #13

  • Andrew Wilkerson
  • Andrew Wilkerson's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Carver
  • Posts: 63
  • Points: 60
Sounds good Mal. I'm hardly ever down that way these days but I'll let you know. I used to work in Boronia and lived in Knoxfield but moved out here where I could afford a house. Rent prices have gone sky high in those areas.

Sent from my GT-I9100T using Tapatalk 2
Timber
tim·ber/ˈtimbər/
Noun:
Lumber (American English;[1] used only in North America), or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world[2]) is wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 17 Jul 2012 23:51 #14

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
I took the braces off in the dark at 5:30am up a ladder under my car's headlights before work...

I'm quite happy with the result. Looking forward to getting the rest of the sign done!
Attachments:
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 18 Jul 2012 17:34 #15

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
OK. Last stage ready for sanding. This has been dragging on for weeks and the client has been very patient. (and the client is getting an absolute bargain so it's a two-way-street).

After some wonderful advice from Jamie Oxenham I did a lot of machining double-sided to achieve the undercut on the piece.

Router table = 23" x 35"
Finished piece = 70" square x 8" thick
Secret ingredient = good coffee
Jamie's secret process = double sided machined slices
Problem = Each slice contains 3 long panels, requiring registering on the router so I could slide them through and keep them all long pieces (instead of panels being limited to table size). And I wanted each slice to be rotated so that the finished piece contained a criss-cross of panels that overlap each other (for strength).

For a first job this has been ridiculous. But I'm ready for coating. I am committed to Styrospray but will probably be not using it again - too little space in my workshop to manage it's application.

My question - This is going to be mounted to the left end of the wall in above pics. There are verticle studs behind the wall board (as opposed to the concrete wall on the right end of the wall). I was planning on coating the piece (after sanding of course), then drilling two holes through the entire piece, approx 2/3 of the way up the piece, and at the same centres as the studs. I will then mount the piece and then glue the final letters onto the piece to cover the bolts. Any hurdles or things I could do differently?
Attachments:
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 18 Jul 2012 20:50 #16

  • Jamie Oxenham
  • Jamie Oxenham's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 108
  • Points: 0
Nice work Mr. Smith. The gears came out pretty nice! I'm glad it worked out with your router size!
WEBSITE: www.oxenhamdesign.com
BLOG:

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 18 Jul 2012 21:28 #17

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
I'm impressed.

One of the good things about beadboard is easily and smooth it sands.

My choice for a hardening undercoat would be Gel Coat. One of the advantages is the color can be added and it's a quick set up.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 18 Jul 2012 22:00 #18

  • Jamie Oxenham
  • Jamie Oxenham's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 108
  • Points: 0
Your not talking poyester gel coat are you Joe. That would eat the PS like a flood of locusts without a heat/ chem barrier.
WEBSITE: www.oxenhamdesign.com
BLOG:

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 18 Jul 2012 22:46 #19

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
While I am ideally aiming for high end material one day... I am also wanting a solution for less affluent clients who need signs mounted above the 'crash zone' (ie. the only protection required is from rain, hail and birds).

I'm already doing a test piece of EPS foam with a couple of coats of Bondcrete (Bondo I think?) and 2-pack automotive topcoat. It's still drying but the bondcrete has completely protected the foam from what I can tell (compared to the unprotected piece I am also testing).

I am aiming to see if a 2-coat Bondcrete and a 2 or 3 coat (thick coats) of 2-pack automotive can yield a satisfactory seal against hail and birds. Not golf ball hail because that will require sign replacement on any sign. But normal hail which we only get 2 or 3 hits a year in Melbourne.

The highest available density HDU we can get in Australia is only 13lb board (210kg/m3)
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 19 Jul 2012 06:54 #20

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Greetings Jamie

You're correct anything with Polyesters in them will destroy beadboard.

The Gel Coats I'm talking about are used in boat building and model airplanes trade. It's a form of epoxy. As you know epoxy will not eat eps foam. We even use disposable foam cups to mix it in.

For a test you might visit a local boat repair to see what Gel Coats they have available and see how they work.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 19 Jul 2012 07:04 #21

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Mal,

I admire your work with eps foam. I'm also interested in finding a good hardcoat. So far I've found Gel Coat to be effective but it's not friendly to spray.

Anything with distilates like paint thinners or polyesters will attach the foam. I've tried protective barriers but the distilates migrate through and destroy the interior.

Saving Money:
I'v found the cost of making a sign doesn't have as much to do with the material costs as does the expense of rent, utilities, auto, insurance, taxes and all that. Even if the materials were free there would be a significant cost to operating a business. That's where the rubber meets the road.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 19 Jul 2012 08:19 #22

  • Ian Stewart-Koster
  • Ian Stewart-Koster's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 93
  • Points: 0
Well done Mal-for a first, that's a magnificent feat.
'Bondo' in North America is more or less what our car bog is.

I have mounted some sizeable signs by using polyurethane glue (moisture cure expanding stuff-like Gorilla glue, to those in USA) and glueing alupanel to the back, and using that to help support or anchor on the bolts. It also helps counteract warping or expansion due to daily temperature changes, a bit.

Seriouly, do NOT try too hard to disguise or hide the bolts/ fixtures-you don't want to have to destroy the sign to get it undone when they move premises in 9 months' time! Use a pocketing or hidden upside-down keyhole system. Just lift the sign up & off bolt heads or batten screws affixed to the wall.

Re materials-have you tried refrig. foam? You can get it in 2" sheets 9ft x 2 ft at about $80? from Plastamasta, from memory.

Re pricing-the client wanting 3D MUST pay. Regardless of material costs. Don't cheapen the trade! (seriously) cheap stuff brings more cheap work.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 19 Jul 2012 17:42 #23

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Thanks for the encouragement people. It is most appreciated. Rest assured I will not be going for lower rung work so apologies for the scare. I have been in the inkjet refilling industry for 8 years designing and making refilling machines. A lot of refillers scrimp and stress about bulk ink costs which is a very small proportion of their actual cost. It doesn't make sense.

So your advice will be heeded. I concur that there is (or should be) no such thing as a cheap 3D sign. It's still a very new and under developed market in a big world of vinyl.

Out of interest here was the rest of the little test with EPS, Bondcrete, and 2-pack. It took a bit of peeling off. The 2-pack has a nice strong stretch to it... I aim to use it a lot in the future.

Sanding the piece is nearly completed. It does sand nice. Except for the Bondcrete joins between panels is a bit tricky. So on to the Styrospray. Breath on hold...

And thanks Joe - I had already asked my local auto paint shop about Gel Coat and they only had polyester based. I will find a boat builder and see what I can track down...

Thx again for the encouragement. I should've started on something simpler I know. But I've always been a sucker for ambition. I think progress requires a certain element of boldness and silliness thrown in there somewhere.
Attachments:
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 19 Jul 2012 18:16 #24

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Mal,

One of the epoxy's for your kind of use is made by Axson. The Al 2108 can be painted on or sprayed. It's good on eps foam.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 20 Jul 2012 07:55 #25

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Thanks Joe - I'll look into it.

Earlier this year I did some research and there was one product used in the theme industry. A 2-pack polyurea coating - not styrospray. It cures in 3 seconds and the applicator can build up the volume very quickly with no noticable sagging. The end result included playground pieces that kids can climb all over.

We have a local father and son business who invested in the $30,000 capital equipment required to apply the product professionally, and they do a lot of work for film studios.

In the end I should have looked further into it. Their initial pricing scared me off. But upon reflection, and the amount of time I have spent doing this project's styrospray so far, I was wrong to ignore the option and will be revisiting it.

You probably lose the same amount of detail as you do with Styrospray, so any nice precision work would not be suitable. But the product is well proven in a much wider industry, and for pieces like the large 'prop' I am currently doing here that will be mounted high up, with no intricate textures etc... I think it could be well worth it.

Perhaps someone here has already looked into it. But I have yet to read about it used by any sign makers.
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 20 Jul 2012 08:11 #26

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Mal,

I believe the product you mentioned is delivered by a "Plural Spray" system. The chemicals mix outside the gun and dries on contact. Like you say it's very tough and durable. The initial cost is somewhat an issue. The fumes are deadly. It requires a dedicated spray room and the operator must be completely covered and needs a fresh air supply. Aside from that it's very good. Forget about saving any detail.

There are several other smaller spray rigs that cost about $700.00 and use packaged tubes. Still, you must wear the suit and have a dedicated room. I've had some of my signs painted with this method and it get a B+. It destroys detail.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 20 Jul 2012 08:15 #27

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Ok thanks Joe. I'll keep it in mind. You've tried it all...
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 20 Jul 2012 08:26 #28

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 05:42 #29

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Joe I'm going to look into the Epoxy Resin further. Can you please tell me your experience with using it? How thin do you need to apply it without slumping? How many coats? Any downsides (since you are still searching for a 'better' solution). Can you reuse the brushes?
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 06:21 #30

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Greetings Mal,

The GelCoat I have is made by Axson #2108. It's good on eps foams of all kinds. You can even mix it up in a styrofoam cup. The pot life is approx 20 minutes. I'd suggest brushing on the first coat or two. It's fairly thin so it can be sprayed if thinned down with a small amount of MEK. That will extend the pot life to about an hour. The MEK flashes so quickly it won't penetrate the first coat and bother the foam.

The people to look at for finishing techniques are the experimental model airplane builders. They use very thin micro fabrics like Depron, for and undercoat of ultimate strength. That combined with the GelCoat is extremely hard.

You will need to use disposable chip brushes. This material flow out but set up quickly enough to build up a good coat.

I don't know if this is the material you are after but it's gets read hard when set up. Right now I'm hardening off my HDU borders. That may sound crazy but it seems to set the surface for painting.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 07:01 #31

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Thanks so much Joe.

I have found a product here called Flowcoat. They also sell Gelcoat but state that it requires absense of air and will remain tacky for days. Their Flowcoat contains a wax additive that lets the underlaying gelcoat set up in under an hour. Are you familiar with this?

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/White-Flowco ... 20c7ccdb12

They also state that the product self levels but does not drain vertically? That doesn't sound right to me.

As seen on their other categories they have a separate category for Epoxy Resins. Is Gelcoat different?
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 07:44 #32

  • Dave Rosenbleeth
  • Dave Rosenbleeth's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Gold Carver
  • Posts: 244
  • Points: 140
Gelcoat is a generic name for resin with color in it.
If the gelcoat requires MEKP (Like the Flowcoat link) as a catalyst then it is a polyester based product and will eat foam.
For foam you want to make sure you are getting an epoxy gelcoat.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 08:32 #33

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Mal,

Dave is correct.

GelCoat is a general term which is made from Polyesters or Epoxy. You don't want any polyesters. That eats eps foams. It's the Epoxy you are after.

All GelCoats I know of comes with colorants. Another important factor is Epoxy is not good as a top coating for outdoors. There isn't a epoxy I've found which has good UV resistance.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 13:36 #34

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
Ok. But the AL2108 is good then.
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 13:44 #35

  • Dave Rosenbleeth
  • Dave Rosenbleeth's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Gold Carver
  • Posts: 244
  • Points: 140
Joe:
You are very correct that epoxy is not stable when exposed to UV in it's normal form. Even most epoxy gelcoats are made for tooling and not exterior use. The first windblades built with West System failed most miserably, but that was a long time ago and lots has been learned since then.
There are now epoxy gelcoats out there that are UV stable due to the additives that the manufacturers put in them and can be used as good long term topcoats.
There is an old axiom in the boat business that you can stick epoxy to polyester but not polyester to epoxy. So quite a few boats have been built by spraying the mold with polyester gelcoat and then using epoxy as the laminating resin with the cloth. The design is done in such a way that once the deck and hull are assembled there is no epoxy laminated surface left exposed, and it is usually painted with epoxy based gelcoat or some catalized linear urethane like Awlgrip or Imron paint anyway.
The advancements made in epoxy technology over the last decade have been amazing. If I were to get into using it in foam sign or relief creation for glue-up or surface prep or finish I would need to do some definite research into new developments.
Last time I actually built a boat with epoxy adhesive and lamination epoxy based gelcoat didn't even exist.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 14:57 #36

  • Joe Crumley
  • Joe Crumley's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Carver
  • Posts: 1026
  • Points: 0
Thanks Dave,

I called Axson and spoke to one of their chemists. He was still firm on not using epoxy as a top coat although they have a product RSF 816 which is made to topcoat surfboards. It's a spray material for just that reason. Even so it will powder up and turn yellow over time. None of that is what Mal is concerned with. All he's wanting to do is harden off eps foam and this will do the trick. It will take several coats.
Joe Crumley
www.normansignco.com

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 15:30 #37

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
OK great. So I don't need to be concerned about UV protection of Epoxy Resin if I'm adding further coats over it for the finish. I just need to get an Epoxy not a Polyester based resin/gelcoat. Correct?
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 16:20 #38

  • Gerry Perrault
  • Gerry Perrault's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Carver
  • Posts: 9
  • Points: 0
Hi
You should look at this site,: www.volatilefree.com look for Qwik-spray system
I bought their special gun and product, it works great on EPS foam.
what i like about this gun is there is 3 products that can be sprayed with it
1) product for EPS
2) one is for the lining for pick-up truck
3) urethane for insulation

The product is shipped in 6 x ( 2 bottles each set) in a case and comes with only 6 mixers
but you can buy some more. For me it is practical, cause you use what you need.

If you go on this site 3d sign forum, go at :''one of these day...
you will see me using that type of equipment.

It sprays easily and dries fast, and they even suggest you to prime as soon as possible.
I don't regret my purchase.

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 16:33 #39

  • Dave Rosenbleeth
  • Dave Rosenbleeth's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Gold Carver
  • Posts: 244
  • Points: 140
You are correct Mel.
The only thing you will have to be concerned about is secondary bonding. In other words ensuring that your topcoat adheres to the epoxy correctly. Some epoxies are made to be bonded to easily and some are not without sanding the finish well. Make sure you get the right information from your supplier or check the manufacturer of what you think you want to buy. Just about any manufacturer has a knowledgable customer service tech who will be very helpful.

Gerry: VFI looks like a great line and I have bookmarked their site. Thanks for sharing the lead!

First commercial job - mounted individual letters 22 Jul 2012 16:41 #40

  • Mal Smith
  • Mal Smith's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Carver
  • Posts: 147
  • Points: 0
OK thanks all. Most appreciated.
The (budding) SignSmith
Melbourne, Australia
Time to create page: 0.685 seconds

Please Visit and Support Our Amazing Sponsors